GO TO THE KEYS

About

How to use

Fact sheets

ID thumbnails

Glossary

Information & links

References

Acknowledgments

Copyright, citation,
and disclaimers

Search DNA
sequences

Lucid3 system
requirements

 

 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Fig. 1: Male

Fig. 2: Male

Fig. 3: Female

Fig. 4: Female

Fig. 5: Female

Fig. 6: Female

Fig. 7: Female

Fig. 8: Female

Fig. 9: Male genitalia

Fig. 10: Female genitalia

Fig. 11: Female sterigma

Fig. 12: Larva

Recognition

Diagnostic features

Adults

FWL: 7.7-10.9mm

This is a highly polymorphic species. According to Powell (1964), California specimens usually have uniform brown, black, or dull red forewings with a gray basal band. Males lack a forewing costal fold.

Related or similar species

Acleris hastiana may appear similar to other species of Acleris due to its highly variable forewing pattern.

Biology

Life history

A. hastiana completes two generations per year in California. Adults are active in June and July and again in August through October.

First instar larvae bore into buds. Later intars feed within shelters constructed by webbing together terminal leaves. Pupation occurs within the larval shelter or on the ground.

Host plants

In North America hastiana has been recorded feeding on blueberry (Vaccinium sp.), bog rosemary (Andromeda sp.), Ceanothus sp., huckleberry (Gaylussacia sp.), oak (Quercus sp.), Rhododendron sp., and willow (Salix sp.).

Area of origin

Europe

Distribution

Holarctic; in North America this species is distributed from the northeastern United States across southern Canada to British Columbia and south along the Pacific Coast to California

Taxonomy

Current valid name

Acleris hastiana (Linnaeus)

Common names

  • [Tortrix moth]

Synonyms

  • A highly variable forewing pattern has led to the description of over 125 synonyms, including many forms, aberrations, and varieties.
  • Peronea hastiana

Placement

Tortricinae: Tortricini

Selected References

Powell, J. A. 1964. Biological and taxonomic studies on tortricine moths, with reference to the species in California. University of California Publications in Entomology. Vol. 32. 317 pp.