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Fig. 1: Male

Fig. 2: Female

Fig. 3: Male genitalia

Fig. 4: Female genitalia

Fig. 5: Female genitalia detail

Recognition

Diagnostic features

Adults

FWL: 9.6-11.2mm

Forewings are straw yellow, narrow, and unmarked, although females may have a faint reticulate pattern. The termen is steeply angled creating an apex that is nearly falcate in some individuals. Hindwings are primarily white. Males have a forewing costal fold.

Related or similar species

Xenotemna pallorana is similar but can be distinguished from clemensiana based on the following characters: pallorana males do not have a forewing costal fold, the hindwings are not white, and the forewing termen is rounded. Genitalia of the two species are different.

Biology

Life history

Clepsis clemensiana completes two annual generations in California. Adults are present in June through September.

Larvae feed and pupate in silk tubes constructed on grass blades.

Host plants

Larvae feed primarily on grasses (Poaceae). This species has also been recorded from aster (Aster, Symphyotrichum sp.), dogbane (Apocynum sp.), and goldenrod (Solidago sp.).

Area of origin

North America

Distribution

Northeastern United States and southern Canada, west to British Columbia, south to northern Utah

Taxonomy

Current valid name

Clepsis clemensiana (Fernald)

Common names

  • Clemens' clepsis moth

Synonyms

  • Tortrix clemensiana
  • Archips clemensiana 
  • Tortrix nervosana

Placement

Tortricinae: Archipini

Selected References

Freeman, T. N. 1958. The Archipinae of North America (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). The Canadian Entomologist. 90 (suppl. 7). 89 pp.

Powell, J. A. 1964. Biological and taxonomic studies on tortricine moths, with reference to the species in California. University of California Publications in Entomology. Vol. 32. 317 pp.